The Trump administration unleashed a flood of outrage earlier this month after unveiling a proposal to overhaul the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly called food stamps. The plan would replace half the benefits people receive with boxed, nonperishable – not fresh – foods chosen by the government, not the people eating them.

As dense smoke from regional wildfires spread through communities across western Montana last summer, public health agencies faced an indoor problem, too: Residents suddenly needed filters to clean the air inside homes and public spaces, but there was no obvious funding source to pay for it.

Ellen Leahy, the health officer in charge of the Missoula City-County Health Department, says in the past, when wildfire smoke polluted the air outside, nobody really talked about air filters.

Boom In Antler Pet Chews May Have Opened A Black Market

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Three weeks after he mounted them on the front of his garage, Jeff Young found his prized antlers were literally ripped off.

"I think they just hung on them," Young says of the thieves, pointing up at the empty drill holes on the garage's façade one gray morning in Anchorage this winter.

"They were up on this six-foot ladder, as far as they could get, and then just pulled them down," Young says.

He found the ladder, taken from a nearby construction site, near his garage the next morning.

A good photo can let you see the world in ways you never dreamed of.

That's what struck us about the nominees for the 2018 World Press Photo contest, an annual competition that highlights the best photojournalism of the year. The finalists were just announced.

There were some glimmers of good news in an otherwise grim report released by UNICEF this week documenting the alarmingly high death rate of newborns worldwide: Bangladesh has managed to cut its newborn mortality rate from 64.2 deaths per 1,000 live births in 1990 to 20.1 per 1,000 today. That's 1 in every 50 births. By comparison, in neighboring Pakistan (which has the worst odds of any country) 1 in every 22 newborns doesn't survive.

The Winter Olympics closes the door on the Pyeongchang 2018 Games, with a big party and a last farewell from the 2,920 athletes who competed on ice and snow in South Korea. The number of athletes set a new record; so did the number of nations — 92 – represented.

Pyeongchang organizers promised that the Olympic Stadium, which seats 35,000, will be "filled with the roar of compliments and the applause of friendship."

Welcome to our weekly roundup of education news. This week, students and teachers made major headlines.

Survivors protest gun laws; Lawmakers offer solutions

The only individual gold medal won by an Olympic athlete from Russia came in a ceremony that was different from others at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics: Figure skater Alina Zagitova didn't hear her country's anthem or see its flag, as other medalists did.

Because of doping sanctions against Russia, the Olympic flag flew, and the (rather generic) Olympic anthem was played at the ceremony Friday night. The same procedure occurred on Sunday, when hockey players from Russia beat Germany for gold.

Canada had its best Olympic Games ever medal-wise in Pyeongchang, despite missing out on gold in men's and women's hockey and men's and women's curling — sports that country usually dominates.

The country has 29 medals, including 11 gold. Norway is leading the overall medal count with 38 medals, Germany is in second with 31 and the U.S. is in fourth with 23.

The Olympic Athletes from Russia won 4-3 in a game against Germany where neither team had much to lose.

Germany had defeated hockey powerhouses Sweden and Canada in the semifinals, and the Olympic Athletes from Russia were highly stacked. Neither country had medaled in men's hockey since 2002, when Russia won bronze.

With 0.5 seconds remaining in the first period, Russian Vyacheslav Voynov scored the first point of the match after an ambitious shot that made it past German goaltender Danny aus den Birken.

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Ruth Simmons officially named 8th President of Prairie View A&M University

The Board of Regents of the Texas A&M University System unanimously voted Monday to name Dr. Ruth J. Simmons, a nationally recognized leader in higher education, as the 8th president of Prairie View A