Camila Domonoske

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

A Portland, Ore., demonstration against President-elect Donald Trump included a group of people who engaged in "criminal and dangerous behavior," authorities say, leading police to declare the Thursday night gathering a riot.

Some protesters smashed windows, lit a dumpster on fire, threw objects at police and lit firecrackers, according to The Associated Press.

Police say they responded with non-lethal munitions fired into the crowd, and that 26 people were arrested. The AP has more from the scene:

Updated 8:20 p.m. ET

A young boy desperately pulling back on a woman's arm, as she shouts at an impassive police officer.

Updated at 10:45 ET Wednesday

While votes are still being counted, some high-profile ballot initiatives already have returned clear results — including a slew of states opting in favor of medical or recreational marijuana, and several more raising the minimum wage.

You can see our full list of key ballot measures here, or check out a sample of the highlights:

Canada's Immigration and Citizenship website was down for hours Tuesday and Wednesday — apparently due to a spike in searches by Americans reacting to Tuesday's presidential election. Access was cut off on Election Day; the site was brought back online shortly after 10 a.m. ET.

For the first time, a U.S. state has elected an openly LGBT governor.

The landmark was reached in Oregon, where the Associated Press projects that Kate Brown has won the gubernatorial election.

Brown was the incumbent in her race — but running for election for the first time.

A nearly weeklong strike by Philadelphia transit workers is ending, just in time for Election Day.

Partial service will resume today, with full service on Tuesday, the transit authority said in a statement.

Bus, trolley and subway lines had been shut down since Tuesday. Early this morning, the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority and the Transport Workers Union Local 234 said they'd managed to come to an tentative agreement.

China has ruled that two newly elected Hong Kong lawmakers who insulted the mainland and didn't swear allegiance while taking their oaths of office won't be able to retake the oaths, which means they won't be able to take office.

Beijing announced its decision Monday, by which point there had already been widespread protests against the mainland's intervention. On Sunday night, after the Chinese government signaled it would be stepping into the matter, thousands of protesters took to the streets of Hong Kong, NPR's Rob Schmitz reports.

The Harvard men's soccer team has been suspended for the remainder of the season after the school discovered the team had repeatedly written and circulated vulgar, sexually explicit "scouting reports" about new recruits on the women's team, in a practice that continued up to this year.

Two former allies of New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie have been found guilty of all counts against them in connection with the "Bridgegate" scandal.

The case involved a scheme to intentionally cause traffic problems on the George Washington Bridge in September 2013, as political retaliation against a mayor who did not endorse Christie for re-election. A total of four former top Christie aides have now either pleaded guilty or been found guilty of federal crimes — three of them related to Bridgegate.

The U.S. added 161,000 new jobs in October, with workers seeing strong growth in wages, according to the monthly jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Hourly earnings rose 10 cents over last month, a higher increase than anticipated. In total, wages — now averaging $25.92 an hour — are up 2.8 percent year over year.

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