Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET

Jared Kushner, President Trump's son-in-law and senior advisor, was questioned last month by investigators for special counsel Robert Mueller, who are probing possible collusion between Russian officials and the Trump campaign to influence the outcome of the 2016 election.

Updated at 12 p.m. ET

Slobodan Praljak died Wednesday, just hours after the convicted war criminal interrupted a courtroom hearing to declare his innocence — and then drank a small container of what he said was poison, according to Croatian state media.

Police in Tampa, Fla., say they have arrested the man they believe is responsible for a string of killings in the Seminole Heights area, thanks to a tip received by a police officer doing paperwork at a local McDonald's.

The officer was apparently alerted that a man at the fast food restaurant had a gun.

Iranian wrestler Ali Reza Karimi had his eye on the prize at the U-23 World Championship in Poland: He was heading to certain victory against his Russian opponent.

All was good until his coach shouted from the sidelines "Ali Reza, lose."

The airport on Indonesia's major tourist island of Bali has temporarily reopened after a three-day shutdown, even as an erupting volcano continues to spew ash, blocking flight paths and prompting evacuation calls.

Shortly after officials had extended closure of the airport at Denpasar for another day, they suddenly reversed their decision and announced that it would reopen.

"The airspace will be re-opened" from 3 p.m. local time, Bali Ngurah Rai airport spokesman Arie Ahsanurrohim was quoted by Agence France-Presse as saying.

The man accused of driving a truck into a crowded pedestrian and bicycle path in New York City, killing eight and injuring a dozen others, has pleaded not guilty to murder and terrorism-related charges.

Sayfullo Saipov, 29, who arrived in the U.S. from Uzbekistan in 2010, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in connection with the Oct. 31 vehicle attack.

Pope Francis, delivering a closely watched speech in Myanmar, called on the Southeast Asian country to respect all religious groups. But as some had feared and others had hoped, the pontiff failed to mention by name the persecuted Muslim Rohingya minority.

Updated at 5:40 a.m. ET

Police in the Kenyan capital fired tear gas to hold back crowds trying to force their way into a sports stadium to attend the inauguration of President Uhuru Kenyatta to a second term. Elsewhere in the city, police were taking similar measures to put down anti-Kenyatta protests.

According to The Associated Press: "Police patrolled the Jacaranda grounds where the leading opposition group, the National Super Alliance, had urged supporters to gather to remember those killed in post-election protests since August."

Updated at 3 a.m. ET

Chinese Gen. Zhang Yang committed suicide last week amid an investigation into his ties with two disgraced military figures caught up in the country's aggressive anti-corruption drive, state media reported Tuesday.

Pope Francis began a visit to Myanmar and Bangladesh on Monday, sparking speculation that he might add the weight of the Vatican to the region's crisis over the alleged ethnic cleansing of Rohingya Muslims.

Francis, the first pontiff to ever visit the Southeast Asian country, arrived in Yangon, Myanmar's largest city, where he was greeted by thousands of the country's Catholics who lined the motorcade route.

Pages